Improving Employee Attitudes Toward Safety in the Workplace

Document created by 1050210 on Nov 10, 2014
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Published Date: 03/31/2014

 

Reneé Watkins

By Reneé Watkins

 

Most safety managers will agree that the most difficult part of implementing a safety policy is getting employees to take safety seriously and to support the policy as it relates to them and to their fellow team members.

 

In the day-to-day production environment, where employees have a specific set of tasks to execute each day, safety concerns regarding the safe and proper execution of these tasks are often overlooked as routine redundancy takes over. The repetitive nature of the process can sometimes cause employees to implement shortcuts or even ignore safety precautions.

 

This is further complicated by taking new hires through the safety policy training only to have them mentored by someone who does not take safety seriously and undermines everything they have been taught through onboarding.

 

So, how does a safety manager promote safety policy throughout the organization with existing employees and alter their thought process to put safety at the forefront of everything they do? Below are three lessons and insights taken from high-stake manufacturing and construction industries that may help safety managers engage their employees in supporting a safety policy across the board.

 

Demonstrate Employee Wellness as a Priority

 

Ensure that corporate leadership prioritizes wellness in the workplace with a healthy balance of employer-sponsored benefits for both the physical and emotional well-being of the workforce. Opportunities for gym memberships, nutrition analysis and professional counseling are just a few examples of how management can show concern for their employees’ overall health.

 

Involve Employees in Safety Policy and Engagement

 

Communication should be a two-way street in order for any policy to work effectively. Regular emails or other policy reminders with regard to safety in the workplace will serve to remind everyone that safety is a priority, as well as a concern. Employees should also be involved in providing feedback to management relating to any safety concerns they notice or would like to see incorporated into a policy. An open-door approach, which encourages employees to speak freely if they feel there is a risk on the production floor, should be present and communicated.

 

Measure Employee Stress Levels

 

Employees are often unable to separate their professional lives from their personal lives and many have issues they deal with on both sides of the fence each and every day. Management in every level of the organization should pay close attention to the overall emotional health of their employees and act to offer assistance at any time when something seems amiss. Team members who may know the details of what their fellow co-workers are facing should be encouraged to speak up and inform management when they feel involvement is warranted, without fear of being exposed for breaking the confidence of their co-worker.

 

These techniques can also apply to more than just manufacturing and construction, and will help safety managers to convey the importance of employee safety with management’s full support. By demonstrating a genuine concern for employee safety and promoting that concern through frequent and consistent communications with the workforce, safety in the workplace will remain at the forefront of each worker’s mind as they go about the execution of their daily tasks.

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