Winter Months Bring Seasonal HR Challenges

Document created by 1002043 on Oct 30, 2015Last modified by 1002043 on Nov 8, 2015
Version 1Show Document
  • View in full screen mode

george pic for news.jpgWinter months are just around the corner and with them comes colder weather.  We don't get as much "white stuff" as our Northern Brethren but when we do things get messy.  Be reminded that employee injuries on employer owned and maintained parking lots may be covered by workers' compensation and my be OSHA recordable depending upon circumstances relating to the injury.  If injuries occur at a reasonable time (just prior to or just after work) and injuries result in medical treatment, days away from work or restricted activity, both workers' comp and OSHA record keeping come into play.

 

Winter weather poses a particular problem regarding parking lot and sidewalk injuries.  Both should be maintained free of snow and ice to prevent employee injuries.  Potential costly injures to customers, vendors and to the general public would not be covered by workers' compensation but by an employer's liability insurance.

 

Employers also need to be aware of the dangers of overexertion in winter months.  Liberty Mutual Insurance Company conducted a study a few years ago revealing that more than 25% of disabling workplace injuries resulted from overexertion.  Overexertion also poses a major threat to ones' health and life outside of work, especially in geographical areas that experience extreme snow and ice accumulation like the Northeast this past winter.  Around 100 people die in the US every winter as a result of shoveling snow.  For suggestions on preventing serious injury or death from shoveling snow, click here.  For more tips dealing with colder weather go to http://m.fema.gov/during-weather-storms-extreme-cold.

 

Perhaps a more vexing issue we deal with each year surrounds pay practices during inclement weather.  Exempt employees are paid on a salaried basis. If the company is closed, the exempt employee must be paid for the day(s) to maintain the exemption status. It is the company’s decision as to whether or not exempts are required to take a vacation day.  Keep in mind that if the exempt does not have vacation or PTO to cover the absence, the exempt must be paid.

 

If the office is open and the exempt decides not to report to work, the day can be charged to vacation or PTO. If in this situation the exempt does not have vacation or PTO, the company is allowed to dock for the day due to personal reasons. This is one of the allowed deductions under the FLSA without destroying the exemption status. Be reminded, however, that if the exempt works any part of the day, the exempt must be paid for the entire day. This often comes in to play when the exempt does not come into work but works a partial day from a laptop or other electronic device.  For CAI survey data on office closings click here.

Recent News Articles

 

ALERT: YOU CAN NOW READ THE CAI NEWS WITHOUT LOGGING IN!!

 

Employers Advised to Factor the New Overtime Rule into 2016 Expense Budget

 

Do Women make Better Managers than Men?

 

CAI Survey Snapshot: What Areas Saw the Most Gains in Employee Satisfaction

 

Engaging Your Employees Requires an Understating of Human Behavior

 

Winter Months Bring Seasonal HR Challenges

 

Two Basic Things Employees Need From Their Boss

 

Tips to Make Your Presentation Unforgettable

 

FLSA's "Hot Goods" Provision

 

The Journey of an HR Business Partner: Where Are You?

 

Preparing for the USDOL's New Overtime Rule

 

Keys to an Effective Performance Incentive Program

 

The FLSA's Nursing Mother Amendment

 

Telecommuting Should Be Carefully Planned

 

Talent Management: Processes, execution trump fancy systems

 

The Six Most Common Talent Management Mistakes

 

Workplace Rudeness is Highly Contagious, Study Says

 

Using HR Metrics to Drive Business Results through Talent

 

Handwritten Notes Trump Computer Note-Taking for Retaining Information

 

Leading a Millennial Workforce

 

Return to Standard Time November 1st

 

Welcome New Association Members - September

 

Fixing a Broken Performance Management System - Part II

 

Two New Bills Signed by Governor McCrory: Unemployment, National Guard Rights

 

Are You a Micromanager or Macromanager?

 

Politics at Work: Respect in a Diverse Workplace

 

How to Grow Organizational Capabilities by Creating a Learning Culture

 

Fixing a Broken Performance Management System - Part I

Attachments

    Outcomes